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Hosting a virtual performance requires the same care and attention as a live event: Sanjoy K Roy, MD, Teamwork Arts

AI and virtual reality could help traverse the world instead of the flatbed or the cramped seat, says Roy.

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The new normal has given a new perspective to the events and entertainment industry. We certainly live in a different world than we did at before covid-19, and the creative industry also had to restructure how it worked in the past year.

Attendance, engagement, outcomes — these are all important things — but the future, including post-COVID events, for the time being, is going to be geared toward virtual and safety-first approach.

In the words of Sanjoy K Roy, Managing Director, Teamwork Arts, “Covid-19, has certainly put a spotlight on virtual arts and the entertainment sector, and even on the holy grail of mega events- weddings and religious celebrations, as well as political and ceremonial occasions. The trillion-dollar question to be asked is: will this translate to dollars and cents and will it be able to sustain the event and entertainment industry? How will the creative sector survive, let alone benefit, and who will pay for the ancillary ecosystem?”

There is no doubt that the industry has moved away from physical touch and has been able to scrap out opportunities to connect without one to one engagement. The coming time will see even more emphasis on completely touch less interactions with more reliance on the digital assets.

“AI and virtual reality could help traverse the world instead of the flatbed or the cramped seat. Hosting a virtual performance requires the same care and attention as a live event. With both one needs to effectively promote the event, engage attendees, create surprises and learnings and build a space for interaction, and make sure the event is seen to be successful,” added Roy.

Emphasising the necessity of strong government support, Roy says the sad reality is that without policy intervention and strong state support as we have seen across Europe and the developed world, the entertainment and arts sector will find it difficult to survive the twin onslaught of the pandemic and its consequent economic downturn. 

“What is rarely understood is that the Creative Economy is a necessity and not a luxury and will lead to job and wealth creation. Without the arts, you will have neither innovation nor creativity!”

As we know the artist community has never had it easy and the online transition also came with its own set of challenges. Apart from learning new skills, artists will have to address how to reduce piracy, while reinventing established notions of copyright for online. Digital fatigue and the charm of the live performance will always stay and hence audiences for live shows will never disappear.

“As we look to 2021 with hope of a vaccine to solve our immediate predicament, the fact is that the road to recover will be long and ardous. Those who have access to capital and have the agility to innovate will emerge stronger for the experience, the rest will need to reinvent their world,” he underlined.



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